Start Outlook Calender On Any Day

BY STANLEY ZAROWIN

Q. I never understood why most calendars start the week on a Sunday and end on a Saturday. My workweek begins on Monday, ends on Friday and my weekend days—Saturday and Sunday—are often reserved for linked activities. Is there some way to make my Windows calendar reflect my needs?

A. Good question. I’ve also wondered why calendars break up weekend days. Well, you’ll be happy to know you can customize Outlook’s calendar to display the week any way you want—even starting it on a Wednesday, if that’s your choice, as the screenshot below illustrates.

To customize your calendar, go to Outlook and click on Tools and Options , generating this screen:

Now click on Calendar Options , generating the screen below.

As you can see, by checking or unchecking the days of the week and adjusting the other options, not only can you change the First day of the week to any day, you even can customize your calendar to omit certain days and certain hours (by adjusting Start time and End time ) and show week numbers of the year (under Calendar options ).

In fact, if you work three days a week in one office and two days in another, you may want special calendars for each location.

A second calendar?

That’s right, you can have more than one calendar—even three or more. A new calendar can include all appointments from your primary one or can be a calendar reserved for special dates.

To create an additional calendar, go to your Folder List and right-click on Calendar , producing the screen at right.

If you want the second calendar to include a copy of your primary calendar, click on Copy “Calendar” and if you want a new, blank calendar, click on New Folder and give it a name.

 

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