Cell Phone Courtesy

BY DIANE BROOKS PLENINGER

During a break at a recent CPE session sponsored by the state society, someone conducted a conversation on his cell phone in the classroom.

Perhaps the caller did not realize how loudly he was speaking or how far voices carry, but we could hear everything that was said. At best this may have annoyed some people; at worst we now know several of the caller’s clients. Even in a gathering of CPAs, this is not a desirable result. Why should others be subjected to the details of someone’s life, personal or business, in any setting?

It is easy enough to find a quiet, private spot to conduct a cell phone conversation. Just seek out the nearest phone booth, stand near it and speak quietly. If this is done discreetly, nobody will notice or overhear. And that’s what professionals want. Right?

Diane Brooks Pleninger, CPA
Anchorage, Alaska

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