Accountants Should Not Discriminate

BY NEIL D. FRIEDMAN

The author of “A Nice Niche—If You Minimize Liability Risk” ( JofA, Feb.01, page 49) warns practitioners to accept only the most ethical and upright potential clients. Similar advice is commonly given to auditors. The result is that the most experienced, resourceful accountants service the most solid, trusted clients. In contrast, less established or inexperienced practitioners provide services to unproven and unstable concerns.

From an experienced accountant’s point of view, making distinctions between clients may be considered wise, but I believe it could be detrimental to society as a whole. Almost any accountant can audit or provide other accounting services to the archdiocese. The public benefits when the most experienced accountants serve the questionable operators as well.

Neil D. Friedman, CPA
Boulder, Colorado

SPONSORED REPORT

Revenue recognition: A complex effort

Implementing the new standard requires careful judgment. Learn how to make significant accounting judgments and document them and collaborate with peers for consistent application.

VIDEO

How to Excel pivot a general ledger

The general ledger is a vast historical data archive of your company's financial activities, including revenue, expenses, adjustments, and account balances. J. Carlton Collins, CPA, shows how to prepare data for, and mine data with, PivotTables.

QUIZ

News quiz: Taking an economic snapshot and looking to the future

Recent news included IRS actions that affect individuals and partnerships and a possibly influential move by a Big Four accounting firm.Take this short quiz to see how much you know about the news.