Backwards Compatibility


Q. Is it true some applications that run just fine under Windows 95 and 98 won’t run under Windows 2000?

A. I’m sorry to say that is correct. But all is not lost. As part of its pre-upgrade routine, Windows 2000 is designed to do an inventory of all the software on your machine, and it will report which programs may cause problems. If you get the latest upgrades for each of the applications you use, you’ll minimize that problem. Tip: Windows 2000 has a big appetite for RAM. The more you make available, the better the operating system will run. Forget about 64 megabytes—think a minimum of 128 Mb.

Do you have a technology question? Send it to Senior Editor Stanley Zarowin via e-mail at zarowin@mindspring.com or regular mail at the Journal of Accountancy, Harborside Financial Center, 201 Plaza Three, Jersey City, NJ 07311-3881.

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