Government Auditing And Accounting


Y2K x 50

Much of the national attention on Y2K has focused on the federal government—will the IRS be able to process returns? Will Social Security checks stop coming? But each state government also has its own systems to examine, and, under the principle of e pluribus unum, state auditors have banded together to determine how serious the problem is for them. The National State Auditors Association (NSAA) conducted a survey and issued a report with the goal of sharing information and possible solutions.

Year 2000: State Compliance Efforts describes the problem and tabulates the results for the 27 states that responded to the survey. The report draws heavily on GAO information and guidance, but also mentions issues individual states brought up:

  • Critical systems, such as those found in police departments and motor vehicle bureaus, have a high risk of failure.

  • Statewide plans to ensure funding and resources to address Y2K are insufficient or nonexistent.

  • State agencies tend to be overly optimistic about their ability to handle the problem.

  • Agencies have not addressed embedded systems or developed contingency and backup plans.

Below are some key results of the survey. The complete report and survey (about 30 pages) is available at the Illinois auditor general's Web site, www.state.il. us/auditor.



SPONSORED REPORT

Keeping client information safe in an age of scams and security threats

A look at the Dirty Dozen tax scams and ways to protect taxpayer information.

TAX PRACTICE CORNER

More R&D tax help

"Can I use the R&D credit?" PATH Act enhancements make the credit more attractive to a wider range of taxpayers.

QUIZ

Learn to choose between ‘who’ and ‘whom’

Writers can stumble over who and whom (or whoever and whomever). If you write for business, this quiz can help make your copy above reproach.