Technology


  Companies moving IT systems to the cloud are encountering higher costs and more implementation problems than they expected, KPMG International reported in a survey.

About one-third of the more than 650 business and IT leaders in the global survey experienced higher-than-anticipated expenses adopting cloud-computing services, while a similar number reported significant implementation challenges. The survey report is available at tinyurl.com/brdrmq9.

Rick Wright, leader of KPMG’s Global Cloud Enablement Program, said companies need to focus on more than just technology issues when developing their cloud adoption strategies. Companies should examine their business processes and redesign them as needed to secure a smoother transition to the cloud. “Simply put, executives have found that simultaneous process redesign is central to addressing the complexities that often arise in the implementation and operational phases of cloud adoption,” Wright, a partner with KPMG LLP, said in a news release.

Moving to the cloud is not about short-term cost savings, said Erik Asgeirsson, president and CEO of CPA2Biz, the AICPA’s technology subsidiary. “It’s about positioning your business for new fields of growth,” he said. “Down the line, there certainly are cost advantages, but some investment is required upfront, particularly to work through change management issues.”


  Many organizations are unprepared to protect themselves against an emerging, relentless cybersecurity danger that threatens national security and economic stability, according to a new global survey.

Advanced persistent threats (APTs) are not easily deterred, which makes them different from traditional threats, according to global IT association ISACA. But an ISACA survey of more than 1,500 security professionals found that 53% of respondents do not believe APTs differ from traditional threats.

This disconnect indicates that IT professionals and their organizations may not be fully prepared to protect themselves against APTs, according to ISACA.

“APTs are sophisticated, stealthy, and unrelenting,” ISACA International Vice President Christos Dimitriadis said in a news release. “Traditional cyberthreats often move right on if they cannot penetrate their initial target. But an APT will continually attempt to penetrate the desired target until it meets its objective—and once it does, it can disguise itself and morph when needed, making it difficult to identify or stop.”

The survey report is available at tinyurl.com/cqzg67z.

Although more than 70% of the IT professionals surveyed said their organizations can detect APT attacks, and more than 70% said they can respond to APT attacks, their description of controls indicate a misunderstanding and lack of preparation, according to ISACA. Top controls enterprises are using to stop APTs were identified as anti-virus and anti-malware programs (95%) and network perimeter strategies such as firewalls (93%). But APTs have been known to avoid being detected or deterred by these types of controls.

 

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