A bit confusing

BY J. CARLTON COLLINS, CPA

Q: When installing Office 2013 on my 64-bit computer running a 64-bit operating system, the Microsoft installation routine recommends installing the 32-bit version of Office 2013, but it also provides the 64-bit option of Office 2013, which seems to be the more obvious option. Which do you recommend and why?

A: It is true that the Microsoft Office 2013 installation routine recommends you install the 32-bit version, but the installation routine’s small print explains this recommendation. The 32-bit version is compatible with 32-bit add-ons and plug-ins, whereas the 64-bit is not. Additionally, the 64-bit version does not support the ActiveX controls library (which contains ActiveX controls used to build solutions commonly used in Access, Excel, and Word), or SharePoint list controls. If these items are nonissues for you, then installing the 64-bit version of Office 2013 is the better option. The advantage of running the 64-bit version is support for larger files, faster performance, and superior bragging rights at cocktail parties.

SPONSORED REPORT

8 accounting and auditing issues you can’t afford to ignore

Download this sponsored report for an overview of some of the most important developments accountants and auditors are facing today.

DOWNLOAD

Filing season quick guide — Tax year 2014

Tax season started Jan. 20. Download our “quick guide,” a printable card that contains dollar thresholds, tax tables, standard amounts, credits, and deductions to keep at your fingertips during tax season.

TAX NEWS

Expired tax provisions extended for 2014

President Barack Obama signed legislation that retroactively extended more than 50 expired tax provisions for 2014, allowing taxpayers to take advantage of a host of tax incentives during this filing season.