Minority scholarships awarded


Eighty-four accounting students were awarded the AICPA Scholarship for Minority Accounting Students for the 2012–2013 academic year.

The recipients, who were chosen from among 286 applicants, include students in both undergraduate and graduate-level accounting programs who have maintained a minimum 3.3 grade-point average and who plan to pursue CPA licensure.

A complete list of winners is available at aicpa.org/minorityscholarship.

Most of the students received individual awards of $3,000 to pay for expenses related to their pursuit of an accounting degree. Funding for the scholarships is provided by the AICPA Foundation, with contributions for special designated awards from the Accounting Education Foundation of the Texas Society of CPAs, the New Jersey Society of CPAs, and Robert Half International. Winners of the special designated awards are:

Stuart Kessler Scholarship (AICPA)
Nicholas Denice, Roger Williams University, Rhode Island

New Jersey Society of CPAs
Chris Arthur, Rutgers University, New Jersey
Sarah Connell, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Robert Half International
Ronald Dukes, Villanova University, Pennsylvania

Accounting Education Foundation of the Texas Society of CPAs
Stephanie Aranda, Southern Methodist University, Texas
Julio Benavides, Trinity University, Texas
Adlith Castillo, University of Houston
Raheem Farishta, Texas A&M University
Melissa Hernandez, University of Houston
Kevin Kibaara, Texas Southern University
Andrew Quintana, University of Texas at Austin
Shahzad Ramzan, University of Texas at Dallas
Mohammad Raza, University of Texas at Dallas

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