Graduate students receive scholarships


Ten students were awarded the AICPA’s John L. Carey Scholarship, which is given to students from liberal arts and other nontraditional business backgrounds to pursue graduate accounting degrees and become CPAs.

The recipients of the 2012–2013 scholarships are:

  • Philip Casey, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Oliver Chase, University of Vermont
  • Sean Escoffery, University of Texas at Austin
  • Hannah Franklin, University of Texas at Austin
  • Rebecca Hu, University of Southern California
  • Jennifer Millhouse, University of Texas at Austin
  • Kelsey Short, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Rebecca Stone, Vanderbilt University, Tennessee
  • Jacob Summerhays, College of William and Mary, Virginia
  • Lauren VanDyke, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Each recipient receives $5,000 to cover tuition and other educational expenses. The scholarship is funded by an endowment of the AICPA Foundation in honor of John L. Carey, a retired administrative vice president and executive director of the Institute and a former editor and publisher of the JofA. Throughout his career, Carey made it a priority to encourage outstanding students to become CPAs.

The application deadline for the 2013–2014 scholarship is April 1, 2013. Applicants must be full-time, graduate-level students for the upcoming academic year. More information is available at aicpa.org/scholarships.

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