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TECHNOLOGY Q&A
How to Get Those Vanished Tabs at the Bottom of an Excel Workbook to Reappear  
By STANLEY ZAROWIN
FEBRUARY 2010

Q Every now and then the tabs at the bottom of an Excel workbook disappear. I don’t know what I did to cause that to happen, and I can’t figure out how to get the tabs to reappear. Please help.

 

A Any number of things can trigger that disappearing act— most commonly when you inadvertently disconnect the workbook window from the Excel window when using the trio of Restore Window buttons on the title bar (upper right of the Excel screen) and move the window under the status bar. Or a previous user of the file might have made the screen resolution too high, and the tabs get cut off at the bottom of the screen.

 

If, after you corrected those problems, you still can’t see the tabs, here are two likely fixes. If one doesn’t work, try the other.

 

  • Double-click the window’s title bar (see screenshot at right).
  • Open the View tab and in the Window group click Arrange All and then Tiled and OK.

 


TECHNOLOGY Q&A
Program Word to Identify the Last Person Who Reviewed a Memo  
By STANLEY ZAROWIN
FEBRUARY 2010

Q In our firm, various partners frequently review client memos, and it would be very useful if we could identify the last person on the network who worked on the document. Is there a way to do that?

 

A Yes, both Word 2003 and 2007 can do it. In Word 2007, open the Ribbon’s Insert tab and position the insert point where you want the latest name inserted, and in the Text group click on Quick Parts and then on Field. In Word 2003 select Field from the Insert menu.

 

Then, in the Categories list, select Document Information and choose LastSavedBy from the Field names list and Title case in the Format list and click OK (see screenshot below).

 


TECHNOLOGY Q&A
Add the File and Path to a Document or Worksheet So You Can Find It Easier Later  
By STANLEY ZAROWIN
FEBRUARY 2010

Q When I review a paper copy of a worksheet or a document that I prepared some time ago, I’m forever searching around my computer for where I saved it on my hard drive. Is there a way to automatically insert the name and path of the document so it always will appear on the printed version? That way I could always track it down easily.

 

A Many users frequently insert that data in either a header or footer. For instructions on how to insert the information that way, see “A Handy Guide for Creating Custom Headers and Footers” (May 09, page 77). But if you want more options about where to insert the file name and path, here are some suggestions.

 

In Excel, you can add that information to show in a cell by typing this formula in the cell: =CELL(“filename”)

 

To place the file ID anywhere in a Word document, first position the insertion point where you want the data to appear. In Word 2007, open the Insert tab and click on Quick Parts in the Text group and choose Field (see screenshot below).

 

In Word 2003, click on Field under the Insert menu.

 

Then choose Document Information from the Categories list (top left corner of the dialog box) and select FileName from the Field names list and click on the Field Codes button at the bottom of the screen.

 

Then click on OK and Word modifies the display of the dialog box. Now click on Options, which then displays the Field Options dialog box, and click on the Field Specific Switches tab (see screenshot below) and select the \p option to include the path of the file name to be inserted in the field. Then click on Add to Field and on OK twice.

 

 


TECHNOLOGY Q&A
The Power of the New Multifunction Calculator in Windows 7  
By STANLEY ZAROWIN
FEBRUARY 2010

Q I’ve always been a critic of Windows Calculator. Is the calculator in Windows 7 any better?

 

A Yes, it’s much more functional than the earlier version. For example, no longer will you need to turn to Excel to calculate the number of days, weeks, months or years between two dates or to calculate mortgage payments.

 

The Windows 7 Calculator has been beefed up with Programmer, Statistics and Scientific modes. They include templates that calculate gas mileage, hourly wages, mortgage payments, leases and much more. It’s well worth taking a look at it.

 


TECHNOLOGY Q&A
Shortcuts for Windows 7  
By STANLEY ZAROWIN
FEBRUARY 2010

Q I prefer to use keyboard shortcuts rather than break my workflow and lift my fingers from the keyboard to maneuver the mouse. Now that I’ve switched to Windows 7, what are some of the keyboard shortcuts I can use there?

 

A I agree, the mouse should be used only when you have no other choice. Keyboard shortcuts are much faster—once you get used to them. Here are my favorites, but I would also suggest trying out your favorite pre-Windows 7 shortcuts. Most of them will work in the new format.

 

+Left Arrow or +Right Arrow: Depending on the initial position of the window, pressing either the left or right combinations will toggle your active window to the side of the screen corresponding to the direction of the arrow key you pressed. With half the screen now blank, you can place another window in that space.

 

+Shift+Left Arrow or +Shift+Right Arrow: For those with multiple monitors, it moves a window from its current position on one monitor to the corresponding position on the other. Like the above shortcut, it leaves half the screen blank, so you can place another window in that spot with the same process.

 

+Space: Toggles open/close the desktop beneath the currently displayed windows.

 

+Plus key: Zooms in on a window and opens the Magnifier (see screenshot below). It works in your browser, too. And with the Magnifier you can customize your view.

 

 

Alt+Tab: Opens all the preview screens on your taskbar (see screenshot below).

 

 

+T: It’s like the Alt+Tab shortcut, but each time you press this hotkey only one screen will open. Press again and that screen closes and the next one on the right of the last one opens (see screenshot below).

 

 

+Number: Allows you to open the programs or files pinned to the taskbar. So, if Outlook was your left-most icon on the taskbar, +1 would open it, and +2 would open the next one.

 

+M: Minimizes everything on the taskbar and returns you to the desktop.

 

+Tab: Triggers Windows’ Flip 3D function, which allows you to easily flip through your windows like a deck of cards.

 

 

Ctrl+D: Opens text format (see screenshot below).

 

 


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